Dating material teen violence

When it comes to teen dating violence, boys are more likely to report being the victim of violence -- being hit, slapped, or pushed -- than girls.That's the surprising finding of new research from British Columbia, Canada.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship—but these behaviors can become abusive and develop into serious forms of violence.

Pass on the information below, but let your teen know you are SAN FRANCISCO (April 27, 2016) – Futures Without Violence (FUTURES) announced today that it received its first Webby Award for That’s Not Cool, a website aimed at preventing teen dating violence and digital abuse.

Dating violence can take place in person or electronically, such as repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online without consent.

Given that 1 in 5 high schoolers experience dating violence, you’ll want to be sure you do your part to help your child understand what a healthy relationship feels and looks like.

Below you’ll find information and tools to help you talk to your kids about healthy relationships, guidelines on how to navigate their world of cell phones and social networking and how to talk to your kids about being an upstander vs. If you suspect your teen may be a victim of abuse, you are the most important resource and advisor for your child.

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